British Museum (@britishmuseum)

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🏛 Explore 2 million years of human history
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This necklace was made in ancient Egypt over 3,300 years ago. It’s decorated with nineteen gold lizard amulets, gold droplets (possibly meant to be dates), and a central pendant inlaid with lapis lazuli. 
As well as being decorative, it was believed that amulet necklaces like this one gave the wearer the powers symbolised by the animal. For example, the lizard was a symbol of regeneration because of its ability to re-grow wounded limbs. 
Lizards were also believed to be manifestations of the sun-god Atum, as they were often seen basking in the sunshine 🦎🌞 #AncientEgypt #jewellery #jewelry #necklace #lizard #🦎 #BritishMuseum #London #UK
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This necklace was made in ancient Egypt over 3,300 years ago. It’s decorated with nineteen gold lizard amulets, gold droplets (possibly meant to be dates), and a central pendant inlaid with lapis lazuli.
As well as being decorative, it was believed that amulet necklaces like this one gave the wearer the powers symbolised by the animal. For example, the lizard was a symbol of regeneration because of its ability to re-grow wounded limbs.
Lizards were also believed to be manifestations of the sun-god Atum, as they were often seen basking in the sunshine 🦎🌞 #AncientEgypt #jewellery #jewelry #necklace #lizard #🦎 #BritishMuseum #London #UK
💇‍♀️ These intricate pieces of jewellery are all made from hair.

It might be an uncommon material to use today, but in the 19th century there was a whole industry producing hair jewellery in Britain – Queen Victoria was a notable enthusiast.

Sometimes pieces would be made as tokens of remembrance using the hair of recently deceased loved ones, but often hair was used in jewellery because of its material qualities – it’s very fine but strong. Jewellers competed to create the most delicate designs, which were impossible to make in silver or gold.

Discover the forgotten art of hair jewellery in our free display in Room 90.

#BritishMuseum #hair #jewellery #Victorian #London #UK
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💇‍♀️ These intricate pieces of jewellery are all made from hair.

It might be an uncommon material to use today, but in the 19th century there was a whole industry producing hair jewellery in Britain – Queen Victoria was a notable enthusiast.

Sometimes pieces would be made as tokens of remembrance using the hair of recently deceased loved ones, but often hair was used in jewellery because of its material qualities – it’s very fine but strong. Jewellers competed to create the most delicate designs, which were impossible to make in silver or gold.

Discover the forgotten art of hair jewellery in our free display in Room 90.

#BritishMuseum #hair #jewellery #Victorian #London #UK
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This 17th-century German ring is a technical marvel – the inner disc revolves, allowing the wearer to change which design is displayed. An intricately engraved hunting scene is revealed on the side of the disc when turned.

On one side is a portrait of the Greek god Apollo, and on the other are two figures – the figure on the right may represent Bacchus, god of wine.

Swivel rings were fashionable in the 17th and 18th centuries. Most revolved around a central pivot, but this ring is unusual – the disc isn’t fixed and can be turned around at any angle.

#BritishMuseum #jewellery #💍 #Apollo #Bacchus #Germany #London #UK
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This 17th-century German ring is a technical marvel – the inner disc revolves, allowing the wearer to change which design is displayed. An intricately engraved hunting scene is revealed on the side of the disc when turned.

On one side is a portrait of the Greek god Apollo, and on the other are two figures – the figure on the right may represent Bacchus, god of wine.

Swivel rings were fashionable in the 17th and 18th centuries. Most revolved around a central pivot, but this ring is unusual – the disc isn’t fixed and can be turned around at any angle.

#BritishMuseum #jewellery #💍 #Apollo #Bacchus #Germany #London #UK
🐱 Did you know a group of cats used to live at the Museum?

From the 1970s to the 1990s, between 4 and 7 cats were kept to deter mice and rats. There was even a ‘Cat Welfare Society’ set up by Rex Shepherd, a cleaner who was affectionately nicknamed ‘Cat Man’. The group of cats consisted of Suzie, Maisie, Wilson, Pippin and Poppet, who could roll over on command. 
In this photo you can see Pippin, Maisie and Poppet sitting on a wall near the main entrance.

#InternationalCatDay #cats #🐱 #history #BritishMuseum #London #UK
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🐱 Did you know a group of cats used to live at the Museum?

From the 1970s to the 1990s, between 4 and 7 cats were kept to deter mice and rats. There was even a ‘Cat Welfare Society’ set up by Rex Shepherd, a cleaner who was affectionately nicknamed ‘Cat Man’. The group of cats consisted of Suzie, Maisie, Wilson, Pippin and Poppet, who could roll over on command.
In this photo you can see Pippin, Maisie and Poppet sitting on a wall near the main entrance.

#InternationalCatDay #cats #🐱 #history #BritishMuseum #London #UK
✨🐱 Cats were considered sacred in ancient Egypt – they were often mummified and buried in special cemeteries. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, if a cat died in an Egyptian household all the inhabitants would shave their eyebrows!

This life-size sculpture was made over 2,300 years ago and dedicated to the goddess Bastet, who was often represented as a cat. It’s lavishly adorned with gold ear and nose rings and a silver collar.

#InternationalCatDay #cats #🐱 #AncientEgypt #BritishMuseum #London #UK
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✨🐱 Cats were considered sacred in ancient Egypt – they were often mummified and buried in special cemeteries. According to the Greek historian Herodotus, if a cat died in an Egyptian household all the inhabitants would shave their eyebrows!

This life-size sculpture was made over 2,300 years ago and dedicated to the goddess Bastet, who was often represented as a cat. It’s lavishly adorned with gold ear and nose rings and a silver collar.

#InternationalCatDay #cats #🐱 #AncientEgypt #BritishMuseum #London #UK
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‘Tomorrow’s Joe’ is a manga that follows Yabuki Joe, an orphan and ex-convict who fights his way to becoming a champion boxer.

The series has been running for over 50 years, drawn by Chiba Tetsuya and written by Takamori Asao. Original drawings like this one are known as ‘genga’ drawings, which are very rarely seen on display in public. Our #MangaExhibition includes some of the finest examples of these works of art – on show in the UK for the first time.

There’s not long left to catch the exhibition before it closes on 26 August. Book tickets via the link in our bio.

Chiba Tetsuya (b. 1939), Tomorrow’s Joe, 1968–1973. © Tetsuya Chiba/Kodansha Ltd.

#manga #drawing #MangaDrawing #TomorrowsJoe #AshitaNoJoe #Japan #anime #Tetsuya
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‘Tomorrow’s Joe’ is a manga that follows Yabuki Joe, an orphan and ex-convict who fights his way to becoming a champion boxer.

The series has been running for over 50 years, drawn by Chiba Tetsuya and written by Takamori Asao. Original drawings like this one are known as ‘genga’ drawings, which are very rarely seen on display in public. Our #MangaExhibition includes some of the finest examples of these works of art – on show in the UK for the first time.

There’s not long left to catch the exhibition before it closes on 26 August. Book tickets via the link in our bio.

Chiba Tetsuya (b. 1939), Tomorrow’s Joe, 1968–1973. © Tetsuya Chiba/Kodansha Ltd.

#manga #drawing #MangaDrawing #TomorrowsJoe #AshitaNoJoe #Japan #anime #Tetsuya
⚽️💥 Captain Tsubasa is a dynamic, dramatic and exciting manga about football.

The story follows school student and wannabe football star Tsubasa Oozora, who dreams of winning the World Cup for Japan. Originally created in 1981 by manga artist Takahashi Yōichi, it quickly became one of the most popular and best-loved manga series in Japan, helping popularise the sport in the country.

There’s a manga for everyone – find your favourite in our major #MangaExhibition. Ends 26 August – don’t miss out! Book tickets via the link in our bio.

Takahashi Yôichi (b. 1960), Captain Tsubasa, 1981–88. © Yoichi Takahashi/SHUEISHA.

#CaptainTsubasa #Tsubasa #football #manga #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #JapaneseArt #BritishMuseum #soccer
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⚽️💥 Captain Tsubasa is a dynamic, dramatic and exciting manga about football.

The story follows school student and wannabe football star Tsubasa Oozora, who dreams of winning the World Cup for Japan. Originally created in 1981 by manga artist Takahashi Yōichi, it quickly became one of the most popular and best-loved manga series in Japan, helping popularise the sport in the country.

There’s a manga for everyone – find your favourite in our major #MangaExhibition. Ends 26 August – don’t miss out! Book tickets via the link in our bio.

Takahashi Yôichi (b. 1960), Captain Tsubasa, 1981–88. © Yoichi Takahashi/SHUEISHA.

#CaptainTsubasa #Tsubasa #football #manga #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #JapaneseArt #BritishMuseum #soccer
In the comedy manga ‘Saint Young Men’ by Nakamura Hikaru, Jesus and Buddha live together in a tiny apartment in downtown Tokyo.

This scene shows the pair after they have stayed up all night drawing manga. Jesus has fallen asleep with his pen still in his hand while Buddha carries on drawing.

Discover the huge breadth of this captivating art form in our #MangaExhibition. Don’t miss out – the show closes 26 August. Book tickets and find out more via the link in our bio.

Nakamura Hikaru (b. 1984), Saint Young Men (Saint Oniisan). 2016. © Hikaru Nakamura / Kodansha Ltd.

#BritishMuseum #manga #Japan #SaintYoungMen #SaintOniisan #anime #London #exhibition
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In the comedy manga ‘Saint Young Men’ by Nakamura Hikaru, Jesus and Buddha live together in a tiny apartment in downtown Tokyo.

This scene shows the pair after they have stayed up all night drawing manga. Jesus has fallen asleep with his pen still in his hand while Buddha carries on drawing.

Discover the huge breadth of this captivating art form in our #MangaExhibition. Don’t miss out – the show closes 26 August. Book tickets and find out more via the link in our bio.

Nakamura Hikaru (b. 1984), Saint Young Men (Saint Oniisan). 2016. © Hikaru Nakamura / Kodansha Ltd.

#BritishMuseum #manga #Japan #SaintYoungMen #SaintOniisan #anime #London #exhibition
These wonderful gold objects were all found at the Sutton Hoo ship burial. This year marks the 80th anniversary of their discovery.

When they were unearthed, one archaeologist said they ‘shone in the sunshine as on the day they were buried’. Find out more about these objects and read about their discovery in our curator’s blog – #linkinbio.

You can see objects from Sutton Hoo on display in Room 41, and in a special display marking the 80th anniversary of their discovery in Room 2.

#SuttonHoo80 #SuttonHoo #AngloSaxon #archaeology #history #treasure #BritishMuseum #UK #AngloSaxons
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These wonderful gold objects were all found at the Sutton Hoo ship burial. This year marks the 80th anniversary of their discovery.

When they were unearthed, one archaeologist said they ‘shone in the sunshine as on the day they were buried’. Find out more about these objects and read about their discovery in our curator’s blog – #linkinbio.

You can see objects from Sutton Hoo on display in Room 41, and in a special display marking the 80th anniversary of their discovery in Room 2.

#SuttonHoo80 #SuttonHoo #AngloSaxon #archaeology #history #treasure #BritishMuseum #UK #AngloSaxons
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The Sutton Hoo helmet is one of the most iconic objects from Anglo-Saxon England. It’s extremely rare – only four examples are known from this time.

Archaeologists found the helmet along with many other treasures in the centre of a 27-metre-long ship-burial. By precisely locating the remaining fragments and assembling them like a three-dimensional jigsaw, conservators managed to reconstruct the helmet. The complete replica in the second image shows how the original might have looked.

The face-mask is the helmet’s most remarkable feature. It’s a visual puzzle, with two possible ‘solutions’. The first is a human face, complete with copper-alloy eyebrows inlaid with tiny garnets. The second is a bird or dragon flying upwards 🐉✨ Read more about the excavations at Sutton Hoo in our curator’s blog – #linkinbio.

#SuttonHoo80 #SuttonHoo #AngloSaxon #archaeology #history #BritishMuseum #London #UK
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The Sutton Hoo helmet is one of the most iconic objects from Anglo-Saxon England. It’s extremely rare – only four examples are known from this time.

Archaeologists found the helmet along with many other treasures in the centre of a 27-metre-long ship-burial. By precisely locating the remaining fragments and assembling them like a three-dimensional jigsaw, conservators managed to reconstruct the helmet. The complete replica in the second image shows how the original might have looked.

The face-mask is the helmet’s most remarkable feature. It’s a visual puzzle, with two possible ‘solutions’. The first is a human face, complete with copper-alloy eyebrows inlaid with tiny garnets. The second is a bird or dragon flying upwards 🐉✨ Read more about the excavations at Sutton Hoo in our curator’s blog – #linkinbio.

#SuttonHoo80 #SuttonHoo #AngloSaxon #archaeology #history #BritishMuseum #London #UK
This year is the 80th anniversary of the spectacular Sutton Hoo discovery.

In 1939, archaeologists excavating mounds in the east of England revealed the skeleton of a 27-metre-long ship, and inside they found a burial chamber full of incredible treasures. It was probably the burial site of an Anglo-Saxon king – although his identity is lost to time.

These photos show the scale of the excavations in 1939, and the unearthing of some of the gold objects ✨

You can learn more about the excavations at Sutton Hoo in a special display in Room 2.

#SuttonHoo80 #SuttonHoo #AngloSaxon #BritishMuseum #archaeology #history #London #UK
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This year is the 80th anniversary of the spectacular Sutton Hoo discovery.

In 1939, archaeologists excavating mounds in the east of England revealed the skeleton of a 27-metre-long ship, and inside they found a burial chamber full of incredible treasures. It was probably the burial site of an Anglo-Saxon king – although his identity is lost to time.

These photos show the scale of the excavations in 1939, and the unearthing of some of the gold objects ✨

You can learn more about the excavations at Sutton Hoo in a special display in Room 2.

#SuttonHoo80 #SuttonHoo #AngloSaxon #BritishMuseum #archaeology #history #London #UK

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