British Museum (@britishmuseum)

🌎 A museum of the world, for the world
🏛 Explore 2 million years of human history
📸📍Tag our location to be featured

1.6K posts
1.3M followers
431 following
1.6K posts
1.3M followers
following
What’s your favourite flower? 🌻

This sunflower was made by Mary Delany in the late 1700s. Delany mastered the art of imitating flowers by using tiny pieces of paper to build up these intricate ‘mosaicks’, as she called them. The artist began making the botanically accurate works at the age of 72 when she noticed the similarity between a geranium and a piece of red paper sitting on her bedside table. She went on to hone her craft and made nearly 1,000 works depicting all kinds of plants and flowers.

Read our blog to find out more about the remarkable artist behind these amazing collaged creations – link in bio!

#MaryDelany #Delany #flowers #spring #collage #art #WHM2019 #WomenArtists #🌻
15.3K 260
What’s your favourite flower? 🌻

This sunflower was made by Mary Delany in the late 1700s. Delany mastered the art of imitating flowers by using tiny pieces of paper to build up these intricate ‘mosaicks’, as she called them. The artist began making the botanically accurate works at the age of 72 when she noticed the similarity between a geranium and a piece of red paper sitting on her bedside table. She went on to hone her craft and made nearly 1,000 works depicting all kinds of plants and flowers.

Read our blog to find out more about the remarkable artist behind these amazing collaged creations – link in bio!

#MaryDelany #Delany #flowers #spring #collage #art #WHM2019 #WomenArtists #🌻
It’s the #FirstDayOfSpring! 🌻🌷🌸💐 Artist Mary Delany created 985 of these extraordinarily detailed paper collages of flowers, and only started when she was 72! Often mistaken for watercolours, the botanically accurate works are actually made from tiny pieces of paper built up in layers – sometimes using up to 200 paper petals per flower. Each work includes the botanical and common names of the plant – this example is a Rhododendron maximum made in 1778.

Discover how these fascinating works were made and learn more about the life of Mary Delany in our blog post – link in bio!

#MaryDelany #Delany #flowers #spring #collage #art #WHM2019 #WomenArtists #SpringEquinox #💐
15.8K 108
It’s the #FirstDayOfSpring! 🌻🌷🌸💐 Artist Mary Delany created 985 of these extraordinarily detailed paper collages of flowers, and only started when she was 72! Often mistaken for watercolours, the botanically accurate works are actually made from tiny pieces of paper built up in layers – sometimes using up to 200 paper petals per flower. Each work includes the botanical and common names of the plant – this example is a Rhododendron maximum made in 1778.

Discover how these fascinating works were made and learn more about the life of Mary Delany in our blog post – link in bio!

#MaryDelany #Delany #flowers #spring #collage #art #WHM2019 #WomenArtists #SpringEquinox #💐
Advertisement
Can you name #5WomenArtists?

As part of Women’s History Month, we're joining @womeninthearts to champion women artists around the world.

The first image depicts a stunning sculpture by South Korean artist Yeesookyung. She is known for creating works which celebrate vulnerability and imperfection, combining discarded shards of porcelain that are then fused together with 24 karat gold leaf.

The second image shows ‘Poe Clan’, a manga series created by Hagio Moto in the 1970s, featured on a 2018 cover of ‘flowers’ magazine. Hagio Moto is a pioneer of ‘shōjo’ manga, which is aimed at young women – you can see more of her work in our upcoming #MangaExhibition!

Third is a piece by American artist Kara Walker, whose work engages with issues of race and gender, the American Civil War and the legacy of slavery. This print confronts the experience of African slaves in the southern states – the title ‘no world’ is a pun on the phrase ‘New World’. .

Fourth is a postcard by British artist Rachel Whiteread. Best known for her sculptures made from industrial materials, she was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The holes in this postcard transform it into a 2D sculpture – see this work on display in our free exhibition of artists’ postcards.

The final image is an ink drawing by Julie Mehretu, who has described her pieces as 'narrative maps without a specific place or location', and ‘like a strange dream’. Born in Ethiopia, she now lives in New York, creating large-scale abstract works.

Who are your favourite women artists?

#WomensHistoryMonth #WHM19 #Yeesookyung #HagioMoto #PoeClan #KaraWalker #RachelWhiteread #JulieMehretu #BritishMuseum #womenartists
13.7K 138
Can you name #5WomenArtists?

As part of Women’s History Month, we're joining @womeninthearts to champion women artists around the world.

The first image depicts a stunning sculpture by South Korean artist Yeesookyung. She is known for creating works which celebrate vulnerability and imperfection, combining discarded shards of porcelain that are then fused together with 24 karat gold leaf.

The second image shows ‘Poe Clan’, a manga series created by Hagio Moto in the 1970s, featured on a 2018 cover of ‘flowers’ magazine. Hagio Moto is a pioneer of ‘shōjo’ manga, which is aimed at young women – you can see more of her work in our upcoming #MangaExhibition!

Third is a piece by American artist Kara Walker, whose work engages with issues of race and gender, the American Civil War and the legacy of slavery. This print confronts the experience of African slaves in the southern states – the title ‘no world’ is a pun on the phrase ‘New World’. .

Fourth is a postcard by British artist Rachel Whiteread. Best known for her sculptures made from industrial materials, she was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The holes in this postcard transform it into a 2D sculpture – see this work on display in our free exhibition of artists’ postcards.

The final image is an ink drawing by Julie Mehretu, who has described her pieces as 'narrative maps without a specific place or location', and ‘like a strange dream’. Born in Ethiopia, she now lives in New York, creating large-scale abstract works.

Who are your favourite women artists?

#WomensHistoryMonth #WHM19 #Yeesookyung #HagioMoto #PoeClan #KaraWalker #RachelWhiteread #JulieMehretu #BritishMuseum #womenartists
It’s #BritishScienceWeek and #WomensHistoryMonth, so we’re sharing the work of three trailblazing naturalists and artists – Maria Sibylla Merian and her daughters, Dorothea Graff and Johanna Herolt.

Maria Sibylla Merian was an unconventional figure in the scientific world of the late 17th century. Few contemporaries could match her sophisticated combination of art and science. In 1699 she travelled with Dorothea to Surinam in South America, where they made intricate illustrations of plants and animals native to the area. Merian returned to Amsterdam in 1701 and published her research – the first scientific work produced about the region.

Merian trained her two daughters to be equally adept natural history artists. The first image depicting a caterpillar and a bitter orange is by Merian, the second is attributed to Graff, and the last is considered to be a collaboration between Merian and Herolt – the bird and butterfly are by Maria, but the fig branch is by Johanna 🍊🐛 #BSW2019 #WHM2019 #science #MariaSibyllaMerian #illustration #drawing #NaturalHistory #BritishMuseum #London #UK
15.7K 107
It’s #BritishScienceWeek and #WomensHistoryMonth, so we’re sharing the work of three trailblazing naturalists and artists – Maria Sibylla Merian and her daughters, Dorothea Graff and Johanna Herolt.

Maria Sibylla Merian was an unconventional figure in the scientific world of the late 17th century. Few contemporaries could match her sophisticated combination of art and science. In 1699 she travelled with Dorothea to Surinam in South America, where they made intricate illustrations of plants and animals native to the area. Merian returned to Amsterdam in 1701 and published her research – the first scientific work produced about the region.

Merian trained her two daughters to be equally adept natural history artists. The first image depicting a caterpillar and a bitter orange is by Merian, the second is attributed to Graff, and the last is considered to be a collaboration between Merian and Herolt – the bird and butterfly are by Maria, but the fig branch is by Johanna 🍊🐛 #BSW2019 #WHM2019 #science #MariaSibyllaMerian #illustration #drawing #NaturalHistory #BritishMuseum #London #UK
Today is #InternationalWomensDay!

To celebrate, all week we’ll be sharing the stories of female figures from ancient history to the present day – stay tuned for more!

This bronze statuette of a running girl was probably made in Sparta around 520 BC. Unusually for ancient Greece, women in Sparta were expected to take part in athletics – they couldn’t compete in the Olympic Games, but had a festival of their own called the Heraia.

The second image depicts Murasaki Shikibu – often thought of as the world’s first novelist. She wrote the ‘Tale of Genji’ in 11th-century Japan. The tale was still popular in the 1800s when this print was made by Utagawa Kunisada.

The third image is of two chocolate cups, which depict the cottage of the ‘Ladies of Llangollen’. In 1778 Lady Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby fled Ireland and set up home in Wales. Challenging conventions of the time, they lived together for 50 years.

The final image is a beautifully modelled head depicting Arsinoe II, queen of Egypt between 278–270 BC. By royal decree, a statue of her had to be placed in every temple in Egypt, and she was sometimes recognised as Isis, mother goddess and patron of magic.

From artists to athletes, sorceresses to scientists, our curators take a closer look at women who have shaped world history in our blog – #linkinbio

#IWD2019 #BalanceForBetter #WomensHistoryMonth #LGBTQ  #AncientGreece #Japan #AncientEgypt #BritishMuseum #London #UK
14.7K 73
Today is #InternationalWomensDay!

To celebrate, all week we’ll be sharing the stories of female figures from ancient history to the present day – stay tuned for more!

This bronze statuette of a running girl was probably made in Sparta around 520 BC. Unusually for ancient Greece, women in Sparta were expected to take part in athletics – they couldn’t compete in the Olympic Games, but had a festival of their own called the Heraia.

The second image depicts Murasaki Shikibu – often thought of as the world’s first novelist. She wrote the ‘Tale of Genji’ in 11th-century Japan. The tale was still popular in the 1800s when this print was made by Utagawa Kunisada.

The third image is of two chocolate cups, which depict the cottage of the ‘Ladies of Llangollen’. In 1778 Lady Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby fled Ireland and set up home in Wales. Challenging conventions of the time, they lived together for 50 years.

The final image is a beautifully modelled head depicting Arsinoe II, queen of Egypt between 278–270 BC. By royal decree, a statue of her had to be placed in every temple in Egypt, and she was sometimes recognised as Isis, mother goddess and patron of magic.

From artists to athletes, sorceresses to scientists, our curators take a closer look at women who have shaped world history in our blog – #linkinbio

#IWD2019 #BalanceForBetter #WomensHistoryMonth #LGBTQ #AncientGreece #Japan #AncientEgypt #BritishMuseum #London #UK
‘I felt a large scream pass through nature’😱 Edvard Munch printed these words in German at the bottom of his 1895 lithograph of ‘The Scream’. It has been argued that the figure in the artwork isn’t actually screaming, but trying to block out the shriek they hear coming from their surroundings. Munch intended the original title to be ‘The Scream of Nature’. Learn more about this iconic work via the link in our bio.

Explore the man behind ‘The Scream’ – his innovative art, radical ideas, and emotional turmoil in our #MunchExhibition. Early bird ticket offer ends this Sunday 10 March – don’t miss out! Search ‘Munch exhibition’ for tickets.

Edvard Munch (1863–1944), ‘The Scream’. Lithograph, 1895. Private collection, Norway. CC BY 4 The Munch Museum.

#BritishMuseum #EdvardMunch #Munch #TheScream #Scream #😱 #Norway #art #prints #printmaking #London #exhibition
17.5K 86
‘I felt a large scream pass through nature’😱 Edvard Munch printed these words in German at the bottom of his 1895 lithograph of ‘The Scream’. It has been argued that the figure in the artwork isn’t actually screaming, but trying to block out the shriek they hear coming from their surroundings. Munch intended the original title to be ‘The Scream of Nature’. Learn more about this iconic work via the link in our bio.

Explore the man behind ‘The Scream’ – his innovative art, radical ideas, and emotional turmoil in our #MunchExhibition. Early bird ticket offer ends this Sunday 10 March – don’t miss out! Search ‘Munch exhibition’ for tickets.

Edvard Munch (1863–1944), ‘The Scream’. Lithograph, 1895. Private collection, Norway. CC BY 4 The Munch Museum.

#BritishMuseum #EdvardMunch #Munch #TheScream #Scream #😱 #Norway #art #prints #printmaking #London #exhibition
Advertisement
‘The Scream’ is the best known work from a powerful series of images by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch called ‘The Frieze of Life’, first exhibited in 1893. This print from the series is titled ‘Angst’ – it shows a group of blank-faced figures in the same shoreline setting as ‘The Scream’. The artist has given the striking red sky a similar dynamic feel to the more famous work.

We’ve uncovered 10 things you might not have known about Munch’s ‘Scream’ – find out more via the link in our bio!

Edvard Munch (1863–1944), ‘Angst’. Woodcut print, 1896. CC BY 4 The Munch Museum.

#BritishMuseum #EdvardMunch #Munch #TheScream #Scream #😱 #Norway #art #prints #printmaking #London #exhibition #MunchMuseum
10.8K 32
‘The Scream’ is the best known work from a powerful series of images by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch called ‘The Frieze of Life’, first exhibited in 1893. This print from the series is titled ‘Angst’ – it shows a group of blank-faced figures in the same shoreline setting as ‘The Scream’. The artist has given the striking red sky a similar dynamic feel to the more famous work.

We’ve uncovered 10 things you might not have known about Munch’s ‘Scream’ – find out more via the link in our bio!

Edvard Munch (1863–1944), ‘Angst’. Woodcut print, 1896. CC BY 4 The Munch Museum.

#BritishMuseum #EdvardMunch #Munch #TheScream #Scream #😱 #Norway #art #prints #printmaking #London #exhibition #MunchMuseum
😱 ‘The Scream’ is one of the most instantly recognisable images in art.

Its emotional intensity has reverberated through history, becoming a universal symbol of human anxieties.

But did you know it may have been inspired by a Peruvian mummy? Or that the figure might not actually be screaming? Discover 10 things you may not have known about ‘The Scream’ in our blog post – link in bio.

This lithograph of Munch’s famous work is coming to the Museum for our #MunchExhibition. Don’t miss our early bird ticket offer – ends this Sunday 10 March!

Edvard Munch (1863–1944), ‘The Scream’. Lithograph, 1895. Private collection, Norway. CC BY 4 The Munch Museum.

#BritishMuseum #EdvardMunch #Munch #TheScream #Scream #😱 #Norway #art #prints #printmaking #London #exhibition #MunchMuseum
9K 78
😱 ‘The Scream’ is one of the most instantly recognisable images in art.

Its emotional intensity has reverberated through history, becoming a universal symbol of human anxieties.

But did you know it may have been inspired by a Peruvian mummy? Or that the figure might not actually be screaming? Discover 10 things you may not have known about ‘The Scream’ in our blog post – link in bio.

This lithograph of Munch’s famous work is coming to the Museum for our #MunchExhibition. Don’t miss our early bird ticket offer – ends this Sunday 10 March!

Edvard Munch (1863–1944), ‘The Scream’. Lithograph, 1895. Private collection, Norway. CC BY 4 The Munch Museum.

#BritishMuseum #EdvardMunch #Munch #TheScream #Scream #😱 #Norway #art #prints #printmaking #London #exhibition #MunchMuseum
The Mausoleum of Maussollos was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (modern-day Bodrum, in Turkey) for Maussollos, a governor in the Persian Empire.

The tomb was once considered so impressive that the ancient Greeks identified it as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, but by the 15th century it had largely been destroyed. The word ‘mausoleum’ is now used for any grand tomb.

Thanks to @kelisefranclemont for this wonderful sketch of a reconstructed statue from the Mausoleum – some think it might be a representation of Maussollos himself.

Share your artwork of the Museum by tagging the location and we’ll repost our favourites! 📍📷 🎨

#regram #repost #photography #illustration #sketch #sketchbook #drawing #art #ink #BritishMuseum #London #📷 #UK
9.9K 58
The Mausoleum of Maussollos was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (modern-day Bodrum, in Turkey) for Maussollos, a governor in the Persian Empire.

The tomb was once considered so impressive that the ancient Greeks identified it as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, but by the 15th century it had largely been destroyed. The word ‘mausoleum’ is now used for any grand tomb.

Thanks to @kelisefranclemont for this wonderful sketch of a reconstructed statue from the Mausoleum – some think it might be a representation of Maussollos himself.

Share your artwork of the Museum by tagging the location and we’ll repost our favourites! 📍📷 🎨

#regram #repost #photography #illustration #sketch #sketchbook #drawing #art #ink #BritishMuseum #London #📷 #UK
Advertisement
In Chinese popular belief, hell resembles a court room where all souls must plead and be tried for their deeds in life. 
Made between 1522–1620, this green-faced clerk is an assistant to one of the Judges of Hell – he is carrying a scroll weighed down by all the names of those who have committed bad deeds 📜

Explore China’s extraordinary art and culture before the galleries open to the public in a special guided tour. Places are limited, book now via #linkinbio.

#China #BritishMuseum #ceramics #art #gallery #London
16.4K 94
In Chinese popular belief, hell resembles a court room where all souls must plead and be tried for their deeds in life.
Made between 1522–1620, this green-faced clerk is an assistant to one of the Judges of Hell – he is carrying a scroll weighed down by all the names of those who have committed bad deeds 📜

Explore China’s extraordinary art and culture before the galleries open to the public in a special guided tour. Places are limited, book now via #linkinbio.

#China #BritishMuseum #ceramics #art #gallery #London

socviewer.com