British Museum (@britishmuseum)

🌎 A museum of the world, for the world
🏛 Explore 2 million years of human history
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These finely decorated dishes were all made in Ōkawachi, southern Japan, between the 17th and 19th century.

At the time, this area of Japan was famed for its high-quality porcelain – producing everything from brush-rests, bottles and vases to dishes like these. The designs were often inspired by fashionable textile patterns of the day.

Discover the fascinating history of Japan in Rooms 92–94.

#Japan #Japanese #porcelain #ceramic #ceramics #JapaneseArt #BritishMuseum
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These finely decorated dishes were all made in Ōkawachi, southern Japan, between the 17th and 19th century.

At the time, this area of Japan was famed for its high-quality porcelain – producing everything from brush-rests, bottles and vases to dishes like these. The designs were often inspired by fashionable textile patterns of the day.

Discover the fascinating history of Japan in Rooms 92–94.

#Japan #Japanese #porcelain #ceramic #ceramics #JapaneseArt #BritishMuseum
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This statue represents King Thutmose III with his hands in a pose of devotion. Ramesses II put his name on the belt and shoulders, and his son Merenpath added his name on the chest. Ancient Egyptian kings would often alter older statues, replacing a previous pharaoh’s name with their own.

The column in the foreground was made around 1390 BC for a temple dedicated to Horus, the falcon god of kingship.

Explore the art of ancient Egypt in the Egyptian Sculpture Gallery before it opens to the public in our special morning tours – find out more at britishmuseum.org

#BritishMuseum #AncientEgypt #Ramesses #Thutmose #Horus #sculpture #London #UK
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This statue represents King Thutmose III with his hands in a pose of devotion. Ramesses II put his name on the belt and shoulders, and his son Merenpath added his name on the chest. Ancient Egyptian kings would often alter older statues, replacing a previous pharaoh’s name with their own.

The column in the foreground was made around 1390 BC for a temple dedicated to Horus, the falcon god of kingship.

Explore the art of ancient Egypt in the Egyptian Sculpture Gallery before it opens to the public in our special morning tours – find out more at britishmuseum.org

#BritishMuseum #AncientEgypt #Ramesses #Thutmose #Horus #sculpture #London #UK
This colossal statue of Ramesses II once flanked the entrance to the king’s mortuary temple, known as the ‘Ramesseum’. It was carved around 1200 BC from a single block of stone weighing about 20 tonnes, which was transported almost 200 kilometres to the temple on sleds and a purpose-built boat. Like all ancient Egyptian statues it was originally painted – traces of pigment remain on the eyes, skin and headcloth.

Explore 3,000 years of ancient Egyptian history before the galleries open to the public in our special morning tours – find out more at britishmuseum.org 
#BritishMuseum #AncientEgypt #Ramesses #sculpture #London #UK
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This colossal statue of Ramesses II once flanked the entrance to the king’s mortuary temple, known as the ‘Ramesseum’. It was carved around 1200 BC from a single block of stone weighing about 20 tonnes, which was transported almost 200 kilometres to the temple on sleds and a purpose-built boat. Like all ancient Egyptian statues it was originally painted – traces of pigment remain on the eyes, skin and headcloth.

Explore 3,000 years of ancient Egyptian history before the galleries open to the public in our special morning tours – find out more at britishmuseum.org
#BritishMuseum #AncientEgypt #Ramesses #sculpture #London #UK
Ancient Egyptian kings would often alter older statues, replacing a previous pharaoh’s name with their own. Ramesses II, who reigned between 1279–1213 BC, would even rework the facial features of statues to resemble his own.

Both of these sculptures were modified during Ramesses’ reign. The figure on the left was made in about 1479–1425 BC. It almost certainly represents Thutmose III, but his name, once present on the belt, has been erased.

The head on the right was made between 1390–1352 BC, during the reign of Amenhotep III. It originally represented him, but a century later the face was reworked to look like Ramesses’ official portrait.

#BritishMuseum #AncientEgypt #Egypt #Ramesses #Amenhotep #Thutmose #sculpture #London #UK
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Ancient Egyptian kings would often alter older statues, replacing a previous pharaoh’s name with their own. Ramesses II, who reigned between 1279–1213 BC, would even rework the facial features of statues to resemble his own.

Both of these sculptures were modified during Ramesses’ reign. The figure on the left was made in about 1479–1425 BC. It almost certainly represents Thutmose III, but his name, once present on the belt, has been erased.

The head on the right was made between 1390–1352 BC, during the reign of Amenhotep III. It originally represented him, but a century later the face was reworked to look like Ramesses’ official portrait.

#BritishMuseum #AncientEgypt #Egypt #Ramesses #Amenhotep #Thutmose #sculpture #London #UK
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The nickname ‘Big Ben’ is often used for the iconic clock tower which stands at the north end of the Houses of Parliament, but it was first given to the clock’s Great Bell, which weighs over 13 tons! Today marks 160 years since the Great Clock started keeping time.

The Elizabeth Tower, named after Queen Elizabeth II in 2012, was completed in 1859. This print shows how the unfinished clock tower looked in 1858, with scaffolding around the top.

#LondonHistoryDay #BigBen #HousesofParliament #PalaceofWestminster #Westminster #London #LondonHistory #BritishMuseum
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The nickname ‘Big Ben’ is often used for the iconic clock tower which stands at the north end of the Houses of Parliament, but it was first given to the clock’s Great Bell, which weighs over 13 tons! Today marks 160 years since the Great Clock started keeping time.

The Elizabeth Tower, named after Queen Elizabeth II in 2012, was completed in 1859. This print shows how the unfinished clock tower looked in 1858, with scaffolding around the top.

#LondonHistoryDay #BigBen #HousesofParliament #PalaceofWestminster #Westminster #London #LondonHistory #BritishMuseum
#MangaExhibition is now open! 
Immersive and captivating, manga has the power to thrill, shock, amaze and inspire. Its far-reaching influence has expanded into anime and gaming – it’s now a global phenomenon and a multi-billion-pound industry. 
Our exhibition begins by explaining how to read, draw and produce manga, and charts the emergence and development of the artform while diving deeper into its many genres, styles, publishers and artists. 
There’s a manga for everyone! Find yours in this ground-breaking show – book tickets via the link in our bio. 
Supported by Citi
Logistics partner IAG Cargo 
#BritishMuseum #manga #GoldenKamuy #Pokémon #DragonBall #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #MangaArtist #MangaArt #London #Comicon
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#MangaExhibition is now open!
Immersive and captivating, manga has the power to thrill, shock, amaze and inspire. Its far-reaching influence has expanded into anime and gaming – it’s now a global phenomenon and a multi-billion-pound industry.
Our exhibition begins by explaining how to read, draw and produce manga, and charts the emergence and development of the artform while diving deeper into its many genres, styles, publishers and artists.
There’s a manga for everyone! Find yours in this ground-breaking show – book tickets via the link in our bio.
Supported by Citi
Logistics partner IAG Cargo
#BritishMuseum #manga #GoldenKamuy #Pokémon #DragonBall #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #MangaArtist #MangaArt #London #Comicon
Golden Kamuy’ is a tale of survival, drama and adventure set in the early 20th century on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido.

One of the main characters is Asirpa, shown in this image, who is a local Ainu girl (Ainu are indigenous peoples of northern Japan). She befriends Japanese solider Sugimoto Sa’ichi and together with a motley crew of soldiers and ex-convicts, they embark on a race to find stolen Ainu gold. Along the way they protect each other from dangers like wild bears and criminal gangs.

See more from ‘Golden Kamuy’ and explore the powerful visuals and exciting storytelling of manga in our major #MangaExhibition! Book tickets via the link in our bio.

Supported by Citi
Logistics partner IAG Cargo 
Noda Satoru, ‘Golden Kamuy’, 2014 onwards. © Satoru Noda/SHUEISHA 
#BritishMuseum #manga #GoldenKamuy #GoldenKamui #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #MangaArtist #MangaArt #Asirpa
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Golden Kamuy’ is a tale of survival, drama and adventure set in the early 20th century on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido.

One of the main characters is Asirpa, shown in this image, who is a local Ainu girl (Ainu are indigenous peoples of northern Japan). She befriends Japanese solider Sugimoto Sa’ichi and together with a motley crew of soldiers and ex-convicts, they embark on a race to find stolen Ainu gold. Along the way they protect each other from dangers like wild bears and criminal gangs.

See more from ‘Golden Kamuy’ and explore the powerful visuals and exciting storytelling of manga in our major #MangaExhibition! Book tickets via the link in our bio.

Supported by Citi
Logistics partner IAG Cargo
Noda Satoru, ‘Golden Kamuy’, 2014 onwards. © Satoru Noda/SHUEISHA
#BritishMuseum #manga #GoldenKamuy #GoldenKamui #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #MangaArtist #MangaArt #Asirpa
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Enter the world of manga in our new major exhibition!

#MangaExhibition explores the power of the artform – its roots, its evolution and its significance as the phenomenon we know today. The show is the largest of its kind ever to take place in the UK and features unprecedented loans from Japan, including objects from world-famous series like Golden Kamuy, Pokémon, Dragon Ball, Astro Boy and many more.

The Citi exhibition Manga マンガ is now open – book tickets and find out more via the link in our bio!

Supported by Citi
Logistics partner IAG Cargo

#BritishMuseum #manga #GoldenKamuy #Pokémon #DragonBall #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #MangaArtist #MangaArt
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Enter the world of manga in our new major exhibition!

#MangaExhibition explores the power of the artform – its roots, its evolution and its significance as the phenomenon we know today. The show is the largest of its kind ever to take place in the UK and features unprecedented loans from Japan, including objects from world-famous series like Golden Kamuy, Pokémon, Dragon Ball, Astro Boy and many more.

The Citi exhibition Manga マンガ is now open – book tickets and find out more via the link in our bio!

Supported by Citi
Logistics partner IAG Cargo

#BritishMuseum #manga #GoldenKamuy #Pokémon #DragonBall #anime #Japan #MangaDrawing #MangaArtist #MangaArt
💀⌚️This silver skull is around 4 centimetres tall and contains a miniature watch

It was made in Germany between 1655–1665. There was a fashion for skull watches during the 17th century – they were sometimes inscribed with phrases reminding the owner of the fleeting nature of life, and were used as a ‘memento mori’, or reminder of death.

#BritishMuseum #skull #watch #💀 #Germany #silver #London #UK
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💀⌚️This silver skull is around 4 centimetres tall and contains a miniature watch

It was made in Germany between 1655–1665. There was a fashion for skull watches during the 17th century – they were sometimes inscribed with phrases reminding the owner of the fleeting nature of life, and were used as a ‘memento mori’, or reminder of death.

#BritishMuseum #skull #watch #💀 #Germany #silver #London #UK

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