British Museum (@britishmuseum)

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It takes a whole year for woodwork artist Suda Kenji to make these exquisite hand-crafted boxes.

Made using a traditional woodcraft technique called ‘sashimono’, they’re so finely made no glue or nails are required to hold them together. Over 20 layers of lacquer are applied to the wooden panels, and once hardened the surfaces are polished to bring out the natural beauty of the wood – in this case maple. Suda also makes the silver fittings himself, controlling every detail of the production process.
Watch the mini documentary via the link in our bio! 🎥📲 This film series has been produced with the support of JTI.

Suda Kenji (b. 1954), Stela Forest in Winter. Urushi lacquer wooden chest with drawers, 2013.

#SudaKenji #sashimono #craftsmanship #Japan #art #Japanese #woodwork #woodworking #lacquer
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It takes a whole year for woodwork artist Suda Kenji to make these exquisite hand-crafted boxes.

Made using a traditional woodcraft technique called ‘sashimono’, they’re so finely made no glue or nails are required to hold them together. Over 20 layers of lacquer are applied to the wooden panels, and once hardened the surfaces are polished to bring out the natural beauty of the wood – in this case maple. Suda also makes the silver fittings himself, controlling every detail of the production process.
Watch the mini documentary via the link in our bio! 🎥📲 This film series has been produced with the support of JTI.

Suda Kenji (b. 1954), Stela Forest in Winter. Urushi lacquer wooden chest with drawers, 2013.

#SudaKenji #sashimono #craftsmanship #Japan #art #Japanese #woodwork #woodworking #lacquer
Japanese artist Kitagawa Utamaro painted this hanging scroll of a courtesan (high ranked sex worker). The fashions and hairstyle of the woman in this powerful and accomplished artwork date it to 1805–1806. As in many of Utamaro’s greatest works, she is shown in a private moment – intently reading a letter, possibly from her suitor. Courtesans were expected to provide glamorous and cultivated company, as well as sexual services, to wealthy clients. Their lives could be harsh and this exploitation was only rarely alluded to in Utamaro’s art, but it was significant at the time that it was represented at all. 
#Utamaro #Japan #painting #JapaneseArt #19thcentury #Japanese #art #painting
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Japanese artist Kitagawa Utamaro painted this hanging scroll of a courtesan (high ranked sex worker). The fashions and hairstyle of the woman in this powerful and accomplished artwork date it to 1805–1806. As in many of Utamaro’s greatest works, she is shown in a private moment – intently reading a letter, possibly from her suitor. Courtesans were expected to provide glamorous and cultivated company, as well as sexual services, to wealthy clients. Their lives could be harsh and this exploitation was only rarely alluded to in Utamaro’s art, but it was significant at the time that it was represented at all.
#Utamaro #Japan #painting #JapaneseArt #19thcentury #Japanese #art #painting
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Armour and weaponry defined the samurai’s authority on the battlefield and their role as a judge and law-maker. This complete, matching set of armour was made in the 1700s and produced for a member of the powerful Mori family – samurai lords based in western Japan. During this time Japan was largely at peace, so this armour was more for ceremonial occasions than for use in battle. It was a beautifully decorative ensemble of finely crafted materials, including metal, lacquer, textile, leather and horn.

Our conservators have been hard at work getting this imposing suit ready for display – find out what it took to restore this amazing object back to its former glory via the link in our bio. 
You can see this stunning suit of armour in our newly refurbished Mitsubishi Corporation Japanese Galleries.

#Japan #Japanese #Samurai #armour #gallery #museum #BritishMuseum #conservation
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Armour and weaponry defined the samurai’s authority on the battlefield and their role as a judge and law-maker. This complete, matching set of armour was made in the 1700s and produced for a member of the powerful Mori family – samurai lords based in western Japan. During this time Japan was largely at peace, so this armour was more for ceremonial occasions than for use in battle. It was a beautifully decorative ensemble of finely crafted materials, including metal, lacquer, textile, leather and horn.

Our conservators have been hard at work getting this imposing suit ready for display – find out what it took to restore this amazing object back to its former glory via the link in our bio.
You can see this stunning suit of armour in our newly refurbished Mitsubishi Corporation Japanese Galleries.

#Japan #Japanese #Samurai #armour #gallery #museum #BritishMuseum #conservation
The picturesque West Lake in the Chinese city of Hangzhou is depicted on this porcelain dish from the 1700s. The lake and surrounding area contains temples, pagodas, man-made islands and gardens. It has been the subject for the work of artists and writers for thousands of years.

In the early 18th century manufacturers invented new overglaze colours to decorate their porcelain designs with, allowing craftsmen to create detailed and colourful scenes like this. 
#porcelain #WestLake #ChineseArt #China #ceramics #art #BritishMuseum
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The picturesque West Lake in the Chinese city of Hangzhou is depicted on this porcelain dish from the 1700s. The lake and surrounding area contains temples, pagodas, man-made islands and gardens. It has been the subject for the work of artists and writers for thousands of years.

In the early 18th century manufacturers invented new overglaze colours to decorate their porcelain designs with, allowing craftsmen to create detailed and colourful scenes like this.
#porcelain #WestLake #ChineseArt #China #ceramics #art #BritishMuseum
This colourful dish was made to commemorate the marriage of London couple John Garway and Mary Holgrove on 21 May 1663. Garway was a merchant in the woollen trade – the intricately painted ship may refer to the international trading boats that would have departed from the River Thames during this time. Chinese porcelain styles influenced European designs during the early 17th century – the blue border on this dish is decorated with motifs reminiscent of those from China. #Delftware #London #pottery #boat #porcelain #Delft #ceramics #England #UK
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This colourful dish was made to commemorate the marriage of London couple John Garway and Mary Holgrove on 21 May 1663. Garway was a merchant in the woollen trade – the intricately painted ship may refer to the international trading boats that would have departed from the River Thames during this time. Chinese porcelain styles influenced European designs during the early 17th century – the blue border on this dish is decorated with motifs reminiscent of those from China. #Delftware #London #pottery #boat #porcelain #Delft #ceramics #England #UK
These finely decorated porcelain flasks depict dragons – on the left with lotus flowers, and on the right between waves.

They were commissioned by the Ming dynasty Yongle emperor between 1403 and 1424 and were probably used by the imperial family as wine decanters. Their shape was inspired by Middle Eastern glass objects – in the early 15th century the Chinese emperors sponsored maritime expeditions that connected China with the Middle East, prompting new styles to become fashionable for the court. You can see them on display and explore Chinese ceramics from AD 400 to 1912 in Room 95. 
#porcelain #dragons #dragon #China #ChineseHistory #MingDynasty #ceramics #art #BritishMuseum
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These finely decorated porcelain flasks depict dragons – on the left with lotus flowers, and on the right between waves.

They were commissioned by the Ming dynasty Yongle emperor between 1403 and 1424 and were probably used by the imperial family as wine decanters. Their shape was inspired by Middle Eastern glass objects – in the early 15th century the Chinese emperors sponsored maritime expeditions that connected China with the Middle East, prompting new styles to become fashionable for the court. You can see them on display and explore Chinese ceramics from AD 400 to 1912 in Room 95.
#porcelain #dragons #dragon #China #ChineseHistory #MingDynasty #ceramics #art #BritishMuseum
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Suffragettes used coins like this one stamped with ‘votes for women’ to spread their message, even though it was a serious criminal offence. This 1903 penny was anonymously defaced between 1913 and 1914 at the height of the militant suffragette campaign, aimed at achieving the right to vote for women. Women were awarded the partial vote in 1918, winning equal rights in 1928.

Discover stories of dissent and protest through time in our #IObject exhibition. Find out more and book tickets via the link in our bio.

Supported by @Citi

#Suffragettes #Suffragette #BritishMuseum #exhibition #London #history
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Suffragettes used coins like this one stamped with ‘votes for women’ to spread their message, even though it was a serious criminal offence. This 1903 penny was anonymously defaced between 1913 and 1914 at the height of the militant suffragette campaign, aimed at achieving the right to vote for women. Women were awarded the partial vote in 1918, winning equal rights in 1928.

Discover stories of dissent and protest through time in our #IObject exhibition. Find out more and book tickets via the link in our bio.

Supported by @Citi

#Suffragettes #Suffragette #BritishMuseum #exhibition #London #history
Journey through the subversive side of history and uncover thousands of years of dissent in our #IObject exhibition.
We invited Private Eye editor and Have I Got News For You panellist Ian Hislop to find stories of subversion and satire hidden in the Museum's collection. He's curated 100(ish) objects that challenge traditional views of history and tell the stories of the downtrodden, the forgotten, the protestors. 
The Citi exhibition I object: Ian Hislop’s search for dissent is now open – book tickets via the link in our bio. 
Supported by @Citi
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Journey through the subversive side of history and uncover thousands of years of dissent in our #IObject exhibition.
We invited Private Eye editor and Have I Got News For You panellist Ian Hislop to find stories of subversion and satire hidden in the Museum's collection. He's curated 100(ish) objects that challenge traditional views of history and tell the stories of the downtrodden, the forgotten, the protestors.
The Citi exhibition I object: Ian Hislop’s search for dissent is now open – book tickets via the link in our bio.
Supported by @Citi
🦉Owls are sometimes regarded as creatures of ill omen in Chinese culture. In 1973, a painting of a winking owl landed artist Huang Yongyu in trouble. Interpreted as a comment on Chairman Mao’s declining health, he was charged with blaspheming the socialist state. Eventually cleared, Huang protested by painting these two owls. The inscription mentions the artist ‘had no intention of making oblique comments through the depictions [of owls]’. Our new special exhibition ponders protest, uncovers unrest and delves into dissent through 100(ish) specially selected objects. #IObject is now open – find out more and book tickets via the link in our bio.

Supported by @Citi
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🦉Owls are sometimes regarded as creatures of ill omen in Chinese culture. In 1973, a painting of a winking owl landed artist Huang Yongyu in trouble. Interpreted as a comment on Chairman Mao’s declining health, he was charged with blaspheming the socialist state. Eventually cleared, Huang protested by painting these two owls. The inscription mentions the artist ‘had no intention of making oblique comments through the depictions [of owls]’. Our new special exhibition ponders protest, uncovers unrest and delves into dissent through 100(ish) specially selected objects. #IObject is now open – find out more and book tickets via the link in our bio.

Supported by @Citi
There is a high concentration of rock art in Tassili n’Ajjer (meaning ‘plateau of chasms’) in the south east of Algeria. The desert landscape in this region is dotted with more than 15,000 rock paintings and engravings, dating back as far as 12,000 years. The art depicts herds of cattle and large wild animals such as giraffe and elephant, as well as human activities such as hunting and dancing. This photograph shows a piece of in-situ rock art that features a dog and a human figure with a bow and arrows. #RockArt #art #Algeria #dog #dogs #history #BritishMuseum
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There is a high concentration of rock art in Tassili n’Ajjer (meaning ‘plateau of chasms’) in the south east of Algeria. The desert landscape in this region is dotted with more than 15,000 rock paintings and engravings, dating back as far as 12,000 years. The art depicts herds of cattle and large wild animals such as giraffe and elephant, as well as human activities such as hunting and dancing. This photograph shows a piece of in-situ rock art that features a dog and a human figure with a bow and arrows. #RockArt #art #Algeria #dog #dogs #history #BritishMuseum
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🐶This Roman statue of a Molossian hound stands just over one metre tall. These dogs were known for their fierce temperament and were related to the modern mastiff. They were often used as guard dogs by herdsmen and for household security in cities. Despite the fearsome reputation of Molossian hounds, this depiction shows a dog in a relaxed and obedient pose. It’s thought that this marble sculpture from around the 2nd century AD is a replica of an older Greek bronze that is now lost. You can see it on display in Room 22. #Roman #Rome #AncientRome #sculpture #statue #dog #dogs #InternationalDogDay #DogDay #🐶
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🐶This Roman statue of a Molossian hound stands just over one metre tall. These dogs were known for their fierce temperament and were related to the modern mastiff. They were often used as guard dogs by herdsmen and for household security in cities. Despite the fearsome reputation of Molossian hounds, this depiction shows a dog in a relaxed and obedient pose. It’s thought that this marble sculpture from around the 2nd century AD is a replica of an older Greek bronze that is now lost. You can see it on display in Room 22. #Roman #Rome #AncientRome #sculpture #statue #dog #dogs #InternationalDogDay #DogDay #🐶

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