SAAM (@americanart)

Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery 📱 #atSAAM #RenwickGallery Legal: s.si.edu/legal

602 posts
36.2K followers
666 following
602 posts
36.2K followers
following
In the late 1920s, Bill Traylor (ca. 1853–1949) left one lifetime behind and embarked on another. Born enslaved in Alabama, Traylor was an eyewitness to history: the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Great Migration, and the steady rise of African American urban culture in the South. After seven decades of labor, his tethers to plantation life had all fallen away, so he traveled, alone, into the cityscape of segregated Montgomery. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s compelling imagery charts the crossroads of radically different worlds—rural and urban, black and white, old and new—and reveals how one man’s visual record of African American life gives larger meaning to the story of his nation. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s dogs convey a wide range of character types, from docile pets to lethal foes. From the time of slavery, through the decades of Jim Crow segregation and into the present, dogs have been an effective tool for instilling terror. Often portraying the embattled beasts in different colors, Traylor subtly conveyed the notion of an interracial battle. 🎨✏️ #BillTraylor, “Untitled (Dog Fight with Writing),” ca. 1939-1940 #atSAAM
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In the late 1920s, Bill Traylor (ca. 1853–1949) left one lifetime behind and embarked on another. Born enslaved in Alabama, Traylor was an eyewitness to history: the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Great Migration, and the steady rise of African American urban culture in the South. After seven decades of labor, his tethers to plantation life had all fallen away, so he traveled, alone, into the cityscape of segregated Montgomery. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s compelling imagery charts the crossroads of radically different worlds—rural and urban, black and white, old and new—and reveals how one man’s visual record of African American life gives larger meaning to the story of his nation. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s dogs convey a wide range of character types, from docile pets to lethal foes. From the time of slavery, through the decades of Jim Crow segregation and into the present, dogs have been an effective tool for instilling terror. Often portraying the embattled beasts in different colors, Traylor subtly conveyed the notion of an interracial battle. 🎨✏️ #BillTraylor, “Untitled (Dog Fight with Writing),” ca. 1939-1940 #atSAAM
💁‍♀️ #mood 👋 Like many folk artists, Irving Dominick applied his vocational skills to imaginative projects. This sculpture is the best surviving example of the whimsy and care Dominick, a roofer and sheet-metal worker, used to make tin representations of his ten-year-old granddaughter. She is complete with loosely crimped hair, a sunny expression, and circle skirt to match her soldered shoes. Irving Dominick, “Marla,” 1982 #atSAAM #sculpture
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💁‍♀️ #mood 👋 Like many folk artists, Irving Dominick applied his vocational skills to imaginative projects. This sculpture is the best surviving example of the whimsy and care Dominick, a roofer and sheet-metal worker, used to make tin representations of his ten-year-old granddaughter. She is complete with loosely crimped hair, a sunny expression, and circle skirt to match her soldered shoes. Irving Dominick, “Marla,” 1982 #atSAAM #sculpture
Heads up! This is your last weekend to see No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man at the #RenwickGallery before the 1st floor galleries close. #NoSpectators will remain on view on the 2nd floor through Jan 21, 2019. 📷😍 We've loved seeing your posts from your visits to see #NoSpectators at the #RenwickGallery! We'll be sharing some of our favorites in our stories this weekend. 🤔
Which artworks are staying after Sept 16?  Works by David Best, FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt, and Leo Villareal will remain on view through January 21, 2019.

Marco Cochrane, "Truth is Beauty," 2018 #sculpture #smithsonianamericanartmuseum #lookup #museum #burningman
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Heads up! This is your last weekend to see No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man at the #RenwickGallery before the 1st floor galleries close. #NoSpectators will remain on view on the 2nd floor through Jan 21, 2019. 📷😍 We've loved seeing your posts from your visits to see #NoSpectators at the #RenwickGallery! We'll be sharing some of our favorites in our stories this weekend. 🤔
Which artworks are staying after Sept 16? Works by David Best, FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt, and Leo Villareal will remain on view through January 21, 2019.

Marco Cochrane, "Truth is Beauty," 2018 #sculpture #smithsonianamericanartmuseum #lookup #museum #burningman
Remembering artist #JacobLawrence who was born #onthisday in 1917. 📚 Jacob Lawrence researched many of his paintings of African American events by reading books. Looking back at his high school years, he remembered that black culture was "never studied seriously like regular subjects," and so he had to teach himself by visiting libraries and museums. 📚 In this colorful view of reading room, everybody appears absorbed in their books, and the standing figure in the front may represent the artist as a young man, delving deeper into his heritage. 📚
Jacob Lawrence, “The Library,” 1960 📚 #atSAAM #paintings #otd #hbd #americanart #smithsonianamericanartmuseum
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Remembering artist #JacobLawrence who was born #onthisday in 1917. 📚 Jacob Lawrence researched many of his paintings of African American events by reading books. Looking back at his high school years, he remembered that black culture was "never studied seriously like regular subjects," and so he had to teach himself by visiting libraries and museums. 📚 In this colorful view of reading room, everybody appears absorbed in their books, and the standing figure in the front may represent the artist as a young man, delving deeper into his heritage. 📚
Jacob Lawrence, “The Library,” 1960 📚 #atSAAM #paintings #otd #hbd #americanart #smithsonianamericanartmuseum
Oh well, what's life without a few dragons? 🐉🔥
Duane Flatmo built his first kinetic sculpture in 1982 for the Grand Champion Kinetic Sculpture Race, an annual event in which human-powered art sculptures race for three days. This pedal-powered, flame throwing "Tin Pan Dragon" was the first contraption Flatmo brought to Burning Man, and led to more grandiose works. 🐉 🔥 
Duane Flatmo, "Tin Pan Dragon," 2008, recycled found objects. 🐉🔥#NoSpectators #RenwickGallery #therebedragons #kineticsculpture #BurningMan #artshadow #harrypotter #smithsonianamericanartmuseum
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Oh well, what's life without a few dragons? 🐉🔥
Duane Flatmo built his first kinetic sculpture in 1982 for the Grand Champion Kinetic Sculpture Race, an annual event in which human-powered art sculptures race for three days. This pedal-powered, flame throwing "Tin Pan Dragon" was the first contraption Flatmo brought to Burning Man, and led to more grandiose works. 🐉 🔥
Duane Flatmo, "Tin Pan Dragon," 2008, recycled found objects. 🐉🔥#NoSpectators #RenwickGallery #therebedragons #kineticsculpture #BurningMan #artshadow #harrypotter #smithsonianamericanartmuseum
👋 Hi! Hi there! Guess what? Notice something different? We have a new Instagram name! 📱We want to make sure to see all your posts 😍 so please tag us at @americanart 🤳 (And of course #atSAAM and the #RenwickGallery as always.) 📱😍 Alma Thomas, “The Eclipse,” 1970
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👋 Hi! Hi there! Guess what? Notice something different? We have a new Instagram name! 📱We want to make sure to see all your posts 😍 so please tag us at @americanart 🤳 (And of course #atSAAM and the #RenwickGallery as always.) 📱😍 Alma Thomas, “The Eclipse,” 1970
"You see so much more when you look inside.“ Visitor @heatherokimoto snapped this first photo of one of the secret scenes inside the “Paper Arch” at the #RenwickGallery 👁
Since 2013, Michael Garlington and his partner, Natalia Bertotti, have teamed up to create large-scale installations based on religious structures, incorporating Garlington’s elaborately-framed, signature photographs which explore the range of human experience between “the horror and the wonder,” the two extremes of being. Two of these—“Photo Chapel” (2013) and “Totem of Confessions” (2015)—were created for Burning Man and burned at the conclusion of the event. Though influenced by David Best’s temples, one of which Garlington helped build, these installations are meant as places of raucousness and whimsy rather than solemnity and silence.
👁
"Paper Arch," commissioned specifically for the Renwick, expands the pair’s canon into secular architecture, and evokes the symbolic threshold participants cross to enter Burning Man. Exploding into a plume of paper flames that rises to the ceiling, the piece also suggests the ritual conclusion of the weeklong event and calls attention to the sculpture’s own ephemeral nature.
👁
Peepholes in the base of the arch reveal tiny, wondrous scenes. 👁
Michael Garlington & Natalia Bertotti, "Paper Arch," 2018
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"You see so much more when you look inside.“ Visitor @heatherokimoto snapped this first photo of one of the secret scenes inside the “Paper Arch” at the #RenwickGallery 👁
Since 2013, Michael Garlington and his partner, Natalia Bertotti, have teamed up to create large-scale installations based on religious structures, incorporating Garlington’s elaborately-framed, signature photographs which explore the range of human experience between “the horror and the wonder,” the two extremes of being. Two of these—“Photo Chapel” (2013) and “Totem of Confessions” (2015)—were created for Burning Man and burned at the conclusion of the event. Though influenced by David Best’s temples, one of which Garlington helped build, these installations are meant as places of raucousness and whimsy rather than solemnity and silence.
👁
"Paper Arch," commissioned specifically for the Renwick, expands the pair’s canon into secular architecture, and evokes the symbolic threshold participants cross to enter Burning Man. Exploding into a plume of paper flames that rises to the ceiling, the piece also suggests the ritual conclusion of the weeklong event and calls attention to the sculpture’s own ephemeral nature.
👁
Peepholes in the base of the arch reveal tiny, wondrous scenes. 👁
Michael Garlington & Natalia Bertotti, "Paper Arch," 2018
“In a very real sense, O’Sullivan and the other photographers of the West were to the nineteenth century what reconnaissance satellites are to the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.” Trevor Paglen, 2009 
Timothy O’Sullivan documented the American West in the 1860s and 1870s. Paglen notes that O’Sullivan and other nineteenth-century photographers were among the nation’s earliest intelligence gatherers, charting the West for railroads and settlement. He often references O’Sullivan’s work and that of other nineteenth-century photographers as a way to show what is different in today’s landscape—namely, ubiquitous surveillance. 
In “DMSP 5B/F4 From Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation,” [on view in Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen] Paglen captures the same horizon that Timothy O’Sullivan did in 1867. The spy satellite arcing above the lake in Paglen’s photograph was launched in 1973 to monitor weather patterns in the former Soviet Union and Cuba. By replicating O’Sullivan’s viewpoint, Paglen underscores the historical link between photography and surveillance. 📷: Timothy H. O'Sullivan, “Tufa Domes, Pyramid Lake, Nevada,” 1867  #atSAAM #SitesUnseen #SmithsonianAmericanArtMuseum #TimothyOSullivan #photography #photographer
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“In a very real sense, O’Sullivan and the other photographers of the West were to the nineteenth century what reconnaissance satellites are to the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.” Trevor Paglen, 2009
Timothy O’Sullivan documented the American West in the 1860s and 1870s. Paglen notes that O’Sullivan and other nineteenth-century photographers were among the nation’s earliest intelligence gatherers, charting the West for railroads and settlement. He often references O’Sullivan’s work and that of other nineteenth-century photographers as a way to show what is different in today’s landscape—namely, ubiquitous surveillance.
In “DMSP 5B/F4 From Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation,” [on view in Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen] Paglen captures the same horizon that Timothy O’Sullivan did in 1867. The spy satellite arcing above the lake in Paglen’s photograph was launched in 1973 to monitor weather patterns in the former Soviet Union and Cuba. By replicating O’Sullivan’s viewpoint, Paglen underscores the historical link between photography and surveillance. 📷: Timothy H. O'Sullivan, “Tufa Domes, Pyramid Lake, Nevada,” 1867 #atSAAM #SitesUnseen #SmithsonianAmericanArtMuseum #TimothyOSullivan #photography #photographer

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