SAAM (@americanart)

Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery 📱 #atSAAM #RenwickGallery Legal: s.si.edu/legal

611 posts
36.7K followers
667 following
611 posts
36.7K followers
following
On a recent visit to the #RenwickGallery, @pootie_ting shared this photo and a reflection on this artwork by artist Dustin Farnsworth: "Experiencing this piece up close was very much like confronting someone up close, but there was also a feeling of tiredness mixed with the sacred, as the golden paint reminded me of being inside a church or a temple." Dustin Farnsworth, "The Reconstruction of Saints," 2018

Working primarily in wood, Dustin Farnsworth creates haunting storylines that inhabit his intricately detailed portraits of the disadvantaged and the marginalized.  Farnsworth’s work strives to give voice to those who have none, as he tackles issues such as social inequality, police brutality, and the tragic rise of school shootings. His most recent sculptural project incorporates audio interviews with young people from Charlotte, documenting their hopes and fears in a form of oral testimony. His new direction has been profoundly influenced by his artist residencies in Madison, Wisconsin, and Charlotte, North Carolina, where he arrived to witness the aftermath of police shootings of two African Americans, Tony Robinson and Keith Lamont Scott, respectively. Originally, Farnsworth planned an architectural headdress for this portrait to reference Charlotte’s historic buildings. However, upon observing the widespread demolition of historic architecture within the city, he decided to omit it entirely, shearing off the bust at the crown’s intended line as a dramatic statement on gentrification and the loss of cultural inheritance. #DustinFarnsworth #DisruptingCraft #craft #artmuseum #museum #smithsonianamericanartmuseum #americanart
355 9
On a recent visit to the #RenwickGallery, @pootie_ting shared this photo and a reflection on this artwork by artist Dustin Farnsworth: "Experiencing this piece up close was very much like confronting someone up close, but there was also a feeling of tiredness mixed with the sacred, as the golden paint reminded me of being inside a church or a temple." Dustin Farnsworth, "The Reconstruction of Saints," 2018

Working primarily in wood, Dustin Farnsworth creates haunting storylines that inhabit his intricately detailed portraits of the disadvantaged and the marginalized. Farnsworth’s work strives to give voice to those who have none, as he tackles issues such as social inequality, police brutality, and the tragic rise of school shootings. His most recent sculptural project incorporates audio interviews with young people from Charlotte, documenting their hopes and fears in a form of oral testimony. His new direction has been profoundly influenced by his artist residencies in Madison, Wisconsin, and Charlotte, North Carolina, where he arrived to witness the aftermath of police shootings of two African Americans, Tony Robinson and Keith Lamont Scott, respectively. Originally, Farnsworth planned an architectural headdress for this portrait to reference Charlotte’s historic buildings. However, upon observing the widespread demolition of historic architecture within the city, he decided to omit it entirely, shearing off the bust at the crown’s intended line as a dramatic statement on gentrification and the loss of cultural inheritance. #DustinFarnsworth #DisruptingCraft #craft #artmuseum #museum #smithsonianamericanartmuseum #americanart
Brb, just getting cozy under a stack of quilts... ☕️🍵🛌🧵🔷🔶🔺🔻🔸🔹▫️ Quilt making has a long history in America; in the 19th century they were mainly made for utilitarian reasons. Modern quilts are often more decorative in nature. Many traditional quilting techniques remain the same, passed down from generation to generation of women who quilted out of necessity, for recreation, and for self-expression. 🔺🔷🔶🔻🔹▪️🔸 Unidentified (American), "Broken Star," ca. 1930-1949 🧺🧺🧺🧺🧺
Unidentified (Lancaster, Pennsylvania), "Baskets," ca. 1876-1900 🧵🧵🧵🧵
Evelyn Derr or MBK, "Sampler Block Quilt," 1905 💢💢💢💢
Unidentified (American), "Tennessee Circles," ca. 1930-1949 🛏 #atSAAM #handmade #craft #decorativearts #quilting #quiltsofinstagram #fiberarts
295 3
Brb, just getting cozy under a stack of quilts... ☕️🍵🛌🧵🔷🔶🔺🔻🔸🔹▫️ Quilt making has a long history in America; in the 19th century they were mainly made for utilitarian reasons. Modern quilts are often more decorative in nature. Many traditional quilting techniques remain the same, passed down from generation to generation of women who quilted out of necessity, for recreation, and for self-expression. 🔺🔷🔶🔻🔹▪️🔸 Unidentified (American), "Broken Star," ca. 1930-1949 🧺🧺🧺🧺🧺
Unidentified (Lancaster, Pennsylvania), "Baskets," ca. 1876-1900 🧵🧵🧵🧵
Evelyn Derr or MBK, "Sampler Block Quilt," 1905 💢💢💢💢
Unidentified (American), "Tennessee Circles," ca. 1930-1949 🛏 #atSAAM #handmade #craft #decorativearts #quilting #quiltsofinstagram #fiberarts
Defying neat categorization, Sharif Bey’s work ranges from functional pots and beaded necklace forms to sculptures pierced with nails and ceramic shards. Throughout his work, Bey investigates cultural identity, symbols of status and community, and notions of power and ritual. 
The Renwick Invitational is a biennial juried showcase for midcareer and emerging craft artists who deserve wider recognition. The makers selected for Disrupting Craft: Renwick Invitational 2018—Tanya Aguiñiga, Sharif Bey, Dustin Farnsworth, and Stephanie Syjuco—challenge convention and infuse craft with a renewed sense of activism, emotional purpose, and inclusiveness.  #RenwickGallery #disruptingcraft #SharifBey #craft #americanart [detail] Sharif Bey, "Ripened Banana," 2014, vitreous china and mixed media, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Purchase, gift of Walter Read Hovey, by exchange. Installation view, photo credit Libby Weiler.
188 5
Defying neat categorization, Sharif Bey’s work ranges from functional pots and beaded necklace forms to sculptures pierced with nails and ceramic shards. Throughout his work, Bey investigates cultural identity, symbols of status and community, and notions of power and ritual.
The Renwick Invitational is a biennial juried showcase for midcareer and emerging craft artists who deserve wider recognition. The makers selected for Disrupting Craft: Renwick Invitational 2018—Tanya Aguiñiga, Sharif Bey, Dustin Farnsworth, and Stephanie Syjuco—challenge convention and infuse craft with a renewed sense of activism, emotional purpose, and inclusiveness. #RenwickGallery #disruptingcraft #SharifBey #craft #americanart [detail] Sharif Bey, "Ripened Banana," 2014, vitreous china and mixed media, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Purchase, gift of Walter Read Hovey, by exchange. Installation view, photo credit Libby Weiler.
Disrupting Craft: Renwick Invitational 2018 presents the work of Tanya Aguiñiga, Sharif Bey, Dustin Farnsworth, and Stephanie Syjuco, four artists who challenge the conventional definitions of craft by imbuing it with a renewed sense of emotional purpose, inclusiveness, and activism. #RenwickGallery 
Tanya Aguiñiga is a Los Angeles–based artist, designer, and activist. Her work provokes conversation surrounding gender and nationality, often drawing from her background as a Mexican American woman and mother. Aguiñiga crafts furniture, textiles, wearable pieces, sculptures, and site-specific installations that incorporate a range of natural materials, from beeswax to wool to human hair. Using the collaborative nature of craft, she promotes collective creation within communities, spearheading art-based advocacy projects including the Border Art Workshop/Taler de Arte Fronterizo in Maclovio Rojas, Mexico, and AMBOS (Art Made Between Opposite Sides), spanning the US-Mexico border, which seeks to document the emotions of commuters crossing it and gives voice to binational artists.

Exhibition view of Tanya Aguiñiga, "Palapa," 2017 📷 Libby Weiler #craft #americanart #socialpractice
435 3
Disrupting Craft: Renwick Invitational 2018 presents the work of Tanya Aguiñiga, Sharif Bey, Dustin Farnsworth, and Stephanie Syjuco, four artists who challenge the conventional definitions of craft by imbuing it with a renewed sense of emotional purpose, inclusiveness, and activism. #RenwickGallery
Tanya Aguiñiga is a Los Angeles–based artist, designer, and activist. Her work provokes conversation surrounding gender and nationality, often drawing from her background as a Mexican American woman and mother. Aguiñiga crafts furniture, textiles, wearable pieces, sculptures, and site-specific installations that incorporate a range of natural materials, from beeswax to wool to human hair. Using the collaborative nature of craft, she promotes collective creation within communities, spearheading art-based advocacy projects including the Border Art Workshop/Taler de Arte Fronterizo in Maclovio Rojas, Mexico, and AMBOS (Art Made Between Opposite Sides), spanning the US-Mexico border, which seeks to document the emotions of commuters crossing it and gives voice to binational artists.

Exhibition view of Tanya Aguiñiga, "Palapa," 2017 📷 Libby Weiler #craft #americanart #socialpractice
Autumn leaves 🍁 Settle in for a story about an artistic, intrepid woman 💞plus a @smithsonian connection! 🔍
🍁
Mary Morris Vaux received a set of watercolor paints at age eight and began experimenting with painting flowers. The family spent summers in the Canadian Rockies, where Mary and her brothers studied mineralogy and recorded the flow of glaciers in drawings and photographs. Mary became an active mountain climber, outdoorswoman, and photographer. One summer a botanist asked her to paint a rare blooming arnica; her success in recording the flower encouraged her to concentrate on botanical illustration. In 1913 she met Charles Doolittle Walcott, then secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, when he was conducting geological research. They were married a year later. Beginning the following summer, the couple spent from three to four months each season in the Canadian Rockies, where Dr. Walcott continued his geological and paleontological studies. During these summers Mary Vaux Walcott painted hundreds of watercolor studies of native flowers. 🍁🎨🍂🍁🎨🍂 Mary Vaux Walcott, "Untitled (Autumn Leaves)," 1874
253 1
Autumn leaves 🍁 Settle in for a story about an artistic, intrepid woman 💞plus a @smithsonian connection! 🔍
🍁
Mary Morris Vaux received a set of watercolor paints at age eight and began experimenting with painting flowers. The family spent summers in the Canadian Rockies, where Mary and her brothers studied mineralogy and recorded the flow of glaciers in drawings and photographs. Mary became an active mountain climber, outdoorswoman, and photographer. One summer a botanist asked her to paint a rare blooming arnica; her success in recording the flower encouraged her to concentrate on botanical illustration. In 1913 she met Charles Doolittle Walcott, then secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, when he was conducting geological research. They were married a year later. Beginning the following summer, the couple spent from three to four months each season in the Canadian Rockies, where Dr. Walcott continued his geological and paleontological studies. During these summers Mary Vaux Walcott painted hundreds of watercolor studies of native flowers. 🍁🎨🍂🍁🎨🍂 Mary Vaux Walcott, "Untitled (Autumn Leaves)," 1874
In the late 1920s, Bill Traylor (ca. 1853–1949) left one lifetime behind and embarked on another. Born enslaved in Alabama, Traylor was an eyewitness to history: the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Great Migration, and the steady rise of African American urban culture in the South. After seven decades of labor, his tethers to plantation life had all fallen away, so he traveled, alone, into the cityscape of segregated Montgomery. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s compelling imagery charts the crossroads of radically different worlds—rural and urban, black and white, old and new—and reveals how one man’s visual record of African American life gives larger meaning to the story of his nation. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s dogs convey a wide range of character types, from docile pets to lethal foes. From the time of slavery, through the decades of Jim Crow segregation and into the present, dogs have been an effective tool for instilling terror. Often portraying the embattled beasts in different colors, Traylor subtly conveyed the notion of an interracial battle. 🎨✏️ #BillTraylor, “Untitled (Dog Fight with Writing),” ca. 1939-1940 #atSAAM
419 3
In the late 1920s, Bill Traylor (ca. 1853–1949) left one lifetime behind and embarked on another. Born enslaved in Alabama, Traylor was an eyewitness to history: the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Great Migration, and the steady rise of African American urban culture in the South. After seven decades of labor, his tethers to plantation life had all fallen away, so he traveled, alone, into the cityscape of segregated Montgomery. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s compelling imagery charts the crossroads of radically different worlds—rural and urban, black and white, old and new—and reveals how one man’s visual record of African American life gives larger meaning to the story of his nation. ✏️🎨
Traylor’s dogs convey a wide range of character types, from docile pets to lethal foes. From the time of slavery, through the decades of Jim Crow segregation and into the present, dogs have been an effective tool for instilling terror. Often portraying the embattled beasts in different colors, Traylor subtly conveyed the notion of an interracial battle. 🎨✏️ #BillTraylor, “Untitled (Dog Fight with Writing),” ca. 1939-1940 #atSAAM
💁‍♀️ #mood 👋 Like many folk artists, Irving Dominick applied his vocational skills to imaginative projects. This sculpture is the best surviving example of the whimsy and care Dominick, a roofer and sheet-metal worker, used to make tin representations of his ten-year-old granddaughter. She is complete with loosely crimped hair, a sunny expression, and circle skirt to match her soldered shoes. Irving Dominick, “Marla,” 1982 #atSAAM #sculpture
218 1
💁‍♀️ #mood 👋 Like many folk artists, Irving Dominick applied his vocational skills to imaginative projects. This sculpture is the best surviving example of the whimsy and care Dominick, a roofer and sheet-metal worker, used to make tin representations of his ten-year-old granddaughter. She is complete with loosely crimped hair, a sunny expression, and circle skirt to match her soldered shoes. Irving Dominick, “Marla,” 1982 #atSAAM #sculpture
Heads up! This is your last weekend to see No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man at the #RenwickGallery before the 1st floor galleries close. #NoSpectators will remain on view on the 2nd floor through Jan 21, 2019. 📷😍 We've loved seeing your posts from your visits to see #NoSpectators at the #RenwickGallery! We'll be sharing some of our favorites in our stories this weekend. 🤔
Which artworks are staying after Sept 16?  Works by David Best, FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt, and Leo Villareal will remain on view through January 21, 2019.

Marco Cochrane, "Truth is Beauty," 2018 #sculpture #smithsonianamericanartmuseum #lookup #museum #burningman
771 12
Heads up! This is your last weekend to see No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man at the #RenwickGallery before the 1st floor galleries close. #NoSpectators will remain on view on the 2nd floor through Jan 21, 2019. 📷😍 We've loved seeing your posts from your visits to see #NoSpectators at the #RenwickGallery! We'll be sharing some of our favorites in our stories this weekend. 🤔
Which artworks are staying after Sept 16? Works by David Best, FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt, and Leo Villareal will remain on view through January 21, 2019.

Marco Cochrane, "Truth is Beauty," 2018 #sculpture #smithsonianamericanartmuseum #lookup #museum #burningman
Remembering artist #JacobLawrence who was born #onthisday in 1917. 📚 Jacob Lawrence researched many of his paintings of African American events by reading books. Looking back at his high school years, he remembered that black culture was "never studied seriously like regular subjects," and so he had to teach himself by visiting libraries and museums. 📚 In this colorful view of reading room, everybody appears absorbed in their books, and the standing figure in the front may represent the artist as a young man, delving deeper into his heritage. 📚
Jacob Lawrence, “The Library,” 1960 📚 #atSAAM #paintings #otd #hbd #americanart #smithsonianamericanartmuseum
382 7
Remembering artist #JacobLawrence who was born #onthisday in 1917. 📚 Jacob Lawrence researched many of his paintings of African American events by reading books. Looking back at his high school years, he remembered that black culture was "never studied seriously like regular subjects," and so he had to teach himself by visiting libraries and museums. 📚 In this colorful view of reading room, everybody appears absorbed in their books, and the standing figure in the front may represent the artist as a young man, delving deeper into his heritage. 📚
Jacob Lawrence, “The Library,” 1960 📚 #atSAAM #paintings #otd #hbd #americanart #smithsonianamericanartmuseum

socviewer.com